ORIGINAL ARTICLE

  

http://opn.to/a/V8J7U

Determination of the Thermal Behavior of a Colombian Hanging Greenhouse Applying CFD Simulation


ABSTRACT

In Colombia the production of flowers is carried out in different types of greenhouses with a common feature and it is the passive type of climate control. At present, the knowledge on the climatic performance of these structures is scarce. The objective of this work was to evaluate the thermal behavior of a suspension-type chapel greenhouse under diurnal and nocturnal climate conditions under the prevailing meteorological conditions of Bogotá savannah. The evaluation was made by numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applied to a greenhouse dedicated to the production of rose (Rosa sp.). This methodological approach allowed obtaining the thermal distribution patterns inside the greenhouse. It was found that for the meteorological conditions evaluated, the greenhouse generates inadequate thermal conditions for the crop development during the night period, where the value of the temperature obtained was below the recommended minimum of 15°C. The validation of the CFD model was carried out by comparing the results of the simulations and the temperatures recorded in the real prototype of the greenhouse, obtaining an adequate degree of adjustment between the simulated and measured values and with a similar trend during the daily 24 hours.

Keywords: 

computational fluid dynamics; temperature; simulation; diurnal period; nocturnal period.

 


At present, Colombia is the second flower exporter in the world and the first in the Americas. According to reports given by the Flower and Foliage Chain of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MADR) for the year 2017, there were 8.004 hectares dedicated to the production of ornamentals, an area that is distributed in the departments of Cundinamarca and Antioquia. The estimated annual total stem production is 242.944 t. This productive sector contributes significant economic income to the agricultural GDP, generating an income of foreign currency close to 1.312.000.000 US dollars, with roses contributing US$ 6,9 per exported kg yielding a 30% volume of the total exported stems.

The national production of flowers is made in a high percentage under greenhouse; the predominant structure is the traditional greenhouse that occupies 70% of the total area. Other types of greenhouse, such as the hanging greenhouse type, occupy the remaining 30%.

Temperature is one of the most relevant factors when programming climate control activities (Campen & Bot, 2001). Mainly because when it reaches extreme values in passive greenhouses (naturally ventilated) production is partially or totally limited (Kittas et al., 2005). The control of the temperature in the Colombian passive greenhouses is relevant in hot days of high radiation in which it is necessary to evacuate the thermal excesses produced in the interior. Under these conditions it is possible to reach temperatures close to 35°C according to Bojacá et al. (2009) and cause physiological disorders in plants (Sato et al., 2001). Additionally, these periods of high radiation usually generate dry and clear night conditions that favor the appearance of the phenomenon of thermal inversion, a phenomenon in which the interior temperature of the greenhouse is lower than that of the surrounding external air.

The study of the thermal and aerodynamic behavior of a greenhouse can be done through empirical models of energy balance, field experimentation, digital thermography or through numerical simulation applying techniques such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) (Chen, 2009). This tool allows the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the thermal behavior of agricultural or livestock structures under different simulation scenarios (Norton et al., 2007).

The objective of this work consisted in developing and adjusting a 3D CFD numerical model, in order to study the thermal behavior of a Colombian hanging greenhouse under climatic conditions of the Bogotá savanna used for the production of rose (Rosa sp.).

The experimental work was developed in a greenhouse with 8640 m2 of covered area, belonging to a farm dedicated to cut rose production (5º03'22.16''N, 73º55'49.07''W, 2583 masl) located in Cogua Municipality (Cundinamarca). The evaluated greenhouse consisted of 24 spans each with a width of 6.0 m (Figure 1A), the minimum and maximum heights under the channel were 3.2 and 6.4 m, respectively. The longitudinal distance of the greenhouse was 60 m and was oriented in the northeast-southwest direction (NE-SW). Each span had a moveable roof ventilation opening 1.0 m wide and 48 m long and fixed lateral openings 1.9 m wide on each of the four sides of the structure, for a total natural ventilation area of 1927 m2.

The exterior meteorological conditions were evaluated for 24 hours a day, within the period between 00:00 hours on March 29 and 23:00 hours on May 2, 2016. The variables were recorded through of a weather station (Vantage Pro2 Plus, Davis Instruments, Hayward CA), which integrated sensors for global radiation, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, wind speed and direction with a registration frequency of 10 minutes.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf1.jpg

FIGURE 1. 

A) Isometric view of the evaluated greenhouse, B) mesh detail y C) computational domain.

The CFD numerical simulation allows solving the governing equations of fluid flow using the finite volume method (Molina et al., 2009). These equations can be represented as convection-diffusion equations of a fluid for three conservation laws, which include the moment, energy and transport equations of a compressible fluid and in a three-dimensional (3D) field and are expressed as follows:

where ρ is the fluid density (kg m-3), is the nabla operator, φ represents the concentration variable, v is the velocity vector (m s-1), Γ is the diffusion coefficient (m2 s-1) and S represents the source term (Piscia et al., 2012). The turbulent nature of the airflow was simulated using the standard turbulence model k-ε, which is based on two main equations, one for k representing kinetic energy and the other for ε representing the rate of dissipation in time and volume units. The transport equations for k and ε can be modeled as:

where μ is the viscosity and μt is turbulent viscosity in (kg m-1s-1), σk and σϵ are the turbulent Prandtl numbers of Prandtl for k and ε. G k is the generation of turbulent kinetic energy due to velocity gradients, G b is the generation of turbulent kinetic energy due to buoyancy, Y M is the fluctuating dilation in turbulence due to the global dissipation rate and v is the kinematic viscosity coefficient. C , C , C μ , σ k and σ ε are constants with default values. This standard model k-ε has been widely used and validated in studies focused on greenhouses demonstrating an adequate precision (Fatnassi et al., 2006; Katsoulas et al., 2006). All the simulations considered the energy equation, which allowed analyzing the scalar field of temperatures inside the greenhouse. Likewise, the phenomenon of buoyancy was modeled. A phenomenon that drives the movement of air under the condition of external speed was made by means of the Boussinesq approach, which is described as follows:

where ρ ref is the constant density of the flow; T ref is the actual temperature (°C) and β is the coefficient of thermal expansion for air (β = 0.00329°C-1). The Boussinesq approximation is valid if the temperature differences that appear in the computational domain are not too large β(T-T ref ) < 1, a situation that generally occurs in the microclimate study of greenhouse (Baeza et al., 2006).

The selected radiation model was that of discrete ordinates (DO) with angular discretization. This model allows the analysis of climate under nighttime conditions, simulating and resolving the radiation phenomenon from the greenhouse floor to the external environment. For this purpose, the sky was considered a black body with an equivalent temperature (T C ) of 0°C for a predominant scenario of wet and clear nights (Iglesias et al., 2009).

The ANSYS ICEM CFD preprocessing software (v. 17.0) was used to generate a large computational domain composed of the greenhouse and its surroundings. In order to guarantee the no affectation of the numerical solution of the flow field outside the greenhouse and to allow an appropriate definition of the atmospheric boundary layer (Rico, 2011) The dimensions of the computational domain were 354, 260 and 70 m for the x, y and z axes, respectively (Figure 1C). This size was determined following the guidelines for calculating the wind environment around the buildings using CFD (Tominaga et al., 2008). The computational domain consisted of an unstructured mesh of 76.651.871 volumes discretized in space, this number of elements was obtained after verifying the independence of the numerical solutions of the airflow at mesh sizes with a higher and lower number of elements according to the procedure reported by He et al. (2017). A fundamental criterion to establish the accuracy of the solutions is to evaluate the quality of the mesh (Figure 1B). The quality parameters evaluated were the cell size and the cell-to-cell size variation, finding that 93,1% of the cells in the mesh were within the high-quality range (0,95-1). The orthogonal quality was also evaluated, where the minimum value obtained was 0.94, results that were classified within the high-quality range (Flores et al., 2015). The convergence criteria of the model were established in 10-8 for the energy equation and 10-6 for the continuity, momentum and turbulence equations (Baxevanou et al., 2017).

The upper limit of the domain and the surfaces parallel to the flow were set with boundary conditions of symmetrical properties so as not to generate frictional losses of the airflow in contact with these surfaces. The simulations considered the atmospheric characteristics of Cogua Municipality such as atmospheric pressure of 74992 Pa, air viscosity equal to 1,7E-05 kg m-1 s-1 and gravity of 9.81 m s-2. Other properties for polyethylene and agricultural soil such as specific heat (Cp), thermal conductivity (k) and density (ρ) were established according to Villagrán et al. (2012). The perimeter boundaries of the computational domain were established as limits of air intake or pressure output as the case may be. A uniform profile of wind speed was considered, evaluating speeds with values between 0.001 and 1.21 m s-1 and average temperature values for each hour of the day. These values were established based on the climatic information collected during the experimental measurement period.

Other input parameters that are necessary to feed the radiation model are the optical properties of the roofing material such as, absorption coefficient (α) of 0,69, transmission coefficient (Ƭ) of 0,19 and reflection coefficient (ρ) of 0,11. The model did not include any crop and a maximum hermetic seali ng of the greenhouse was assumed. These simplifications are valid since they are applied to each of the simulated cases and the errors that may arise will have the same degree of magnitude for each scenario.

The evaluation was carried out assuming the average meteorological conditions for each hour evaluated (Table 1) and the standard ventilation configuration of the greenhouse studied, which, for this case, was lateral ventilation combined with roof ventilation for daytime hours (6-18 hours) and roof ventilation for nighttime conditions (19-5 hours).

TABLE 1. 

Average meteorological conditions used as input parameters to the CFD-3D model

HourTemperature (°C)Wind speed (km h-1)Wind direction (°)Solar radiation (W m-2)
011,840,001117,620
111,740,007125,850
211,570124,570
311,440119,960
411,320,021123,080
511,390,031115,790
611,290109,780,2
711,450,017118,426,2
812,780,038106,09126,6
914,140,35169,85221,8
1015,790,42212280,1
1116,910,84194353,9
1217,690,85123,5376,9
1318,211,21192,3415,4
1418,381,17192,6356,6
1518,491,18157,4306,8
1618,231,19112,8238,9
1716,830,89156,590,3
1815,80,49155,830,2
1914,350,25132,30
2013,50,05115,90
2112,980,01117,30
2212,590,02121,90
2312,250,01120,30

The validation of the CFD model was made through the comparison between the results of the simulations and the experimental records for the same temporal frequency of the temperature inside the real greenhouse during the evaluation period. The temperature of the greenhouse air was recorded by means of thirty T-type thermocouples (copper-constantan) connected to an equal number of data recorders (Cox-Tracer Junior, Escort DLS, Edison, NJ) deployed uniformly at 1,5 m from the ground surface and recording data every 10 minutes.

The model validation was made by comparing the temperature values measured experimentally and those obtained through CFD simulations, for the 24 hours of the day. Figure 2 shows the behavior of the temperature for each evaluated hour, showing a good fit between the two methodologies used and the same trend for the measurement period. Quantitatively, when comparing the measured and simulated data, an average absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 4,26% was obtained, an absolute mean error (MAE) of 0,75°C and a mean square error (MSE) of 0,94°C, values that guarantee that the use of the CFD model is adequate for the evaluation and description of the thermal behavior of the greenhouse.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf2.jpg

FIGURE 2. 

Temperature profile measured and simulated inside hanging greenhouse type.

Table 2 shows the time evolution of the interior greenhouse temperature for the daytime period. It is observed that the variable presented a minimum value of 12,17°C for hour 6 and reached a maximum value of 24,31°C at hour 14, this temporary increase is driven by the solar radiation. The thermal difference between the interior and the exterior of the greenhouse (ΔT = T internal -T external ) exhibited a minimum value of 0,88°C for the hour 6. This value is consistent since the indoor air comes from an energy loss process during the night hours and additionally, the solar radiation for the hour 6 is generally low in the intertropical zones, therefore, the energy gain inside the greenhouse is also low. The maximum value of ΔT was 5,93°C for hour 14, a value that is generated as a function of the thermal gain inside the greenhouse over the course of 7 hours (7-14 hours).

TABLE 2. 

Average interior temperature and thermal difference between the interior and exterior of the greenhouse for simulated daytime scenarios

HourAverage internal temperature (°C)Thermal difference (ΔT, °C)
612,170,88
714,162,71
817,524,74
918,554,41
1020,344,55
1121,384,47
1223,055,36
1324,105,89
1424,315,93
1524,125,63
1621,172,94
1719,182,35
1817,711,91

Temperature is one of the main parameters that affects the quality and growth of the flower stems. In the case of rose cultivation, it is recommended that optimum temperatures during the daytime period should be between 21 and 24°C Yong (2004). For the evaluated case, it is observed that this is fulfilled for the period between 11 and 16 hours; however, for the remaining hours the temperature are lower than recommended; this translates into longer vegetative cycles and lower stem production (Zieslin and Mor, 1990). Additionally, temperatures between 15 and 20°C under high humidity conditions favor the germination of Botrytis cinerea conidia (Restrepo, 2010), a disease that generates great economic losses for rose crops in the Bogota savanna.

Figure 3 shows the thermal distribution patterns in a greenhouse section at 1.5 m from ground level for the hours 8, 12 and 16 (Figure 3 A-C). For the eight hour, a homogeneous thermal behavior can be observed with an average value of 17,52°C (Figure 3A). For the twelfth hour an average temperature of 23,05°C was obtained, under this condition a heterogeneous behavior was observed in 40% of the evaluated area. Higher temperatures were found near the lateral zones with averages of 25,1°C and lower temperatures of 21,1°C in the central zone of the greenhouse, just in the areas of influence of the roof vents (Figure 3B). These heterogeneous conditions are not suitable for the production of flowers since they generate differentiated production volumes of stems in quantity and quality. For the sixteenth hour, the average interior temperature was 21,17°C, observing some areas with temperature values of 22,8°C near the lateral and frontal ventilation openings (Figure 3C). This allows us to conclude that the thermal conditions inside the greenhouse are not thoroughly homogeneous and the thermal behavior for the first hours of the day period are the most unfavorable for the production of roses.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf3.jpg

FIGURE 3. 

Simulated temperature contours (°C) for A) hour 8, B) hour 12 and C) hour 16.

Table 3 shows the average temperature values calculated for the night hours. The maximum temperature value of 16,19°C was registered for the hour 19, moment from which the behavior is decreasing as night passes. This is mainly due to the fact that under passive greenhouses an irradiative cooling is generated from the ground towards the external environment promoted by the confinement of the internal air and the high transmission of the plastic cover of the infrared radiation (Majdoubi et al., 2016).

The greenhouse has an acceptable thermal hermetic sealing, which allowed the generation of a positive ΔT for the hours evaluated, showing maximum and minimum ΔT values of 1,84 and 0,37°C for the first and last hour of the night, respectively. Taking into account that the general conditions were clear and humid it should be mentioned that the greenhouse presented a thermal behavior that limited the occurrence of the thermal inversion phenomenon that under these prevailing meteorological conditions is frequent within Colombian greenhouses.

The general recommendation for the cultivation of rose is to be able to guarantee night temperatures that oscillate between 15 and 17°C (Yong, 2004).The analysis of the data indicated that these recommended values are only obtained for hours 19 and 20. The following hours presented average values below the recommended value which can generate relevant effects on the growth and development of the plant; in productive terms, under these conditions it can be usual to obtain deformed flowers with a number of undesirable petals (Yong, 2004).

TABLE 3. 

Average interior temperature and thermal difference between the interior and exterior of the greenhouse for simulated nighttime scenarios

HourAverage internal temperature (°C)Thermal difference (ΔT, °C)
1916,191,84
2015,231,73
2114,251,27
2213,761,17
2313,291,04
012,620,78
112,340,60
212,290,72
312,190,75
412,060,74
511,760,37

The qualitative analysis of thermal distribution patterns in a horizontal plane at 1.5 m above ground level for hours 20, 0 and 4 is presented in Figures 4 A, B and C. In general, a homogeneous thermal behavior is observed for the three hours evaluated in approximately 95% of the evaluated area.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf4.jpg

FIGURE 4. 

Simulated temperature contours (°C) for A) hour 20, B) hour 0 and C) hour 4.

  • A 3D CFD model was generated to study the thermal behavior of a Colombian-hanging greenhouse. The model was validated through the comparison of experimentally obtained data and simulated data. This comparison showed an adequate degree of adjustment and the same trend, which allows concluding that the CFD model is reliable to develop numerical simulations and can be used to evaluate the thermal behavior of another type of greenhouse under the same meteorological conditions.

  • The results showed an optimal thermal behavior for six of the thirteen hours evaluated during the daytime period, during these six hours the temperature ranged in the optimum interval for the production of rose that is between 21 and 24°C. For the night period it was found that the thermal behavior is inadequate for nine of the eleven hours evaluated, the temperature values were lower than the recommended minimum of 15°C. These conditions can limit the final production of the rose crop and the commercial quality of the flower stems.

  • It is recommended that subsequent studies include another series of climatic parameters, such as relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit or ventilation rates, which will allow an analysis of the microclimatic behavior of the greenhouse and relate it to the agronomic and physiological behavior of the plants.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors express their gratitud to Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje (SENA), Asociación Colombiana de Exportadores de Flores (Asocolflores) and Centro de Innovación de la Floricultura Colombiana (Ceniflores). Conflict of interests: El manuscrito fue preparado y revisado con la participación de todos los autores, quienes declaramos que no existe conflicto. Funding: This study was funded by SENA, Ceniflores and Asocolflores through the execution of the project “Generación de una herramienta de diseño u optimización de ventilación natural de los invernaderos dedicados a la producción de flores de corte en cuatro subregiones de la Sabana de Bogotá, mediante el uso de herramientas de simulación basadas en la técnica Dinámica de Fluidos Computacional (CFD)”.

 

REFERENCES

BAEZA, E.J.; PÉREZ-PARRA, J.J.: LÓPEZ, J.C.; MONTERO, J.I. CFD study of the natural ventilation performance of a parral type greenhouse with different numbers of spans and roof vent configurations. Acta Horticulturae 719: 333-338, 2006.

BAXEVANOU, C.; FIDAROS, D.; BARTZANAS, T.; KITTAS, C.; Yearly numerical evaluation of greenhouse cover materials. Computers and Electronics in Agriculture, 149 (1): 54-70, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2017.12.006

BOJACÁ, C. R.; GIL, R.; COOMAN, A.; Use of geostatistical and crop growth modelling to assess the variability of greenhouse tomato yield caused by spatial temperature variations. Computers and Electronics in Agriculture , 65(2): 219-227, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2008.10.001

CAMPEN, J. B.; BOT, G. P. A. SE-Structures and Environment: Design of a Low-Energy Dehumidifying System for Greenhouses. Journal of Agricultural Engineering Research, 78(1): 65-73, 2001, https://doi.org/10.1006/JAER.2000.0633, 2004.

CHEN, Q.; Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: A method overview and recent applications. Building and Environment, 44(4): 848-858, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2009.05.025

FLORES-VELÁZQUEZ, J.; VILLARREAL-GUERRERO, F.; Diseño de un sistema de ventilación forzada para un invernadero cenital usando CFD, (2015). Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Agrícolas vol. 6, n.2, pp. 303-316.Disponible en: http://www.scielo.org.mx/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S200709342015000200007&lng=es&nrm=iso. ISSN 2007-0934.

FATNASSI, H.; BOULARD, T; PONCET, M. C.; Optimisation of Greenhouse Insect Screening with Computational Fluid Dynamics. Biosystems Engineering, 93(3): 301-312, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.BIOSYSTEMSENG.2006.11.014

HE, X.; WANG, J.; GUO, S.; ZHANG, J.; WEI, B.; SUN, J.; SHU, S.; Ventilation optimization of solar greenhouse with removable back walls based on CFD. Computers and Electronics in Agriculture , 149 (1): 16-25, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2017.10.001

IGLESIAS, N.; MONTERO, J.I.; MUÑOZ, P.; ANTÓN, A.; Estudio del clima nocturno y el empleo de doble cubierta de techo como alternativa pasiva para aumentar la temperatura nocturna de los invernaderos utilizando un modelo basado en la Mecánica de Fluidos Computacional (CFD). Hort. Argentina, 28, 18-23, 2009.

KATSOULAS, N.; BARTZANAS, T.; BOULARD, T.; MERMIER, M.; KITTAS, C.; Effect of Vent Openings and Insect Screens on Greenhouse Ventilation. Biosystems Engineering , 93(4): 427-436, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2005.01.001

KITTAS, C.; KARAMANIS, M.; KATSOULAS, N; Air temperature regime in a forced ventilated greenhouse with rose crop. Energy and Buildings, 2005, 37(8): 807-812, 2005, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2004.10.009

MAJDOUBI, H.; BOULARD, T.; FATNASSI, H.; SENHAJI, A.; ELBAHI, S.; DEMRATI, H.; BOUIRDEN, L.; Canary Greenhouse CFD Nocturnal Climate Simulation. Open Journal of Fluid Dynamics, 6(6): 88-100, 2016. https://doi.org/10.4236/ojfd.2016.62008

MINISTERIO DE AGRICULTURA Y DESARROLLO RURAL (MADR). Estadísticas del sector 2017- Cadena sector flores. https://www.minagricultura.gov.co/Paginas/default.aspx . [Consulta: 21 de abril de 2018].

MOLINA-AIZ, D.; VALERA, D.; PEÑA, A.; GIL, J.; LÓPEZ, A.; A study of natural ventilation in an Almería-type greenhouse with insect screens by means of tri-sonic anemometry. Biosystems Engineering , 104(2): 224-242, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2009.06.013

NORTON, T.; SUN, D.; GRANT, J.; FALLON, R..; DODD, V.; Applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the modelling and design of ventilation systems in the agricultural industry: A review. Bioresource Technology, 98(12): 2386-2414, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2006.11.025

PISCIA, D.; MONTERO, J. I.; BAEZA, E.; BAILEY, B.; A CFD greenhouse night-time condensation model. Biosystems Engineering , 111(2): 141-154, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2011.11.006.

RESTREPO, F. Manual de manejo de Botrytis cinerea en Rosas. Ediciones ceniflores. Bogota-Colombia. 120 p, 2010.

RICO-GARCÍA, E.; Aerodynamic study of greenhouses using computational fluid dynamics. International Journal of the Physical Sciences, 6(28): 2011. https://doi.org/10.5897/IJPS11.852.

SATO, S.; PEET, M. M.; GARDNER, R.G.: Formation of parthenocarpic fruit, undeveloped flowers and aborted flowers in tomato under moderately elevated temperatures. Sci. Hortic. 90: 243-254, 2001. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0304-4238(00)00262-4.

TOMINAGA, Y.; MOCHIDA, A.; YOSHIE, R.; KATAOKA, H.; NOZU, T.; YOSHIKAWA, M.; SHIRASAWA, T.; AIJ guidelines for practical applications of CFD to pedestrian wind environment around buildings. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, 96(10-11): 1749-1761. 2008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jweia.2008.02.058

VILLAGRÁN, E.; GIL, R.; ACUÑA, J. F.; BOJACÁ, C.; Optimization of ventilation and its effect on the microclimate of a colombian multispan greenhouse. Agronomía colombiana, 30(2): 282-288, 2012. ISSN 0120-9965.

YONG, A.; El cultivo del rosal y su propagación Cultivos Tropicales, vol. 25, núm. 2, pp. 53-6 Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Agrícolas La Habana, Cuba, ISSN: 0258-5936, 2004.

ZIESLIN, N.; MOR, Y.; Light on roses. Scientia Horticulturae, 1990, vol. 43, p. 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-4238(90)90031-9.

 

 

 

 


Edwin Andrés Villagrán Munar, PhD student in Environmental Sciences and Sustainability, Departament of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Natural Sciences and Engineering Faculty, Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano, Bogotá, Colombia. e-mail: edwina.villagranm@utadeo.edu.co

Carlos Ricardo Bojacá Aldana, Profesor Basic Sciences and Modeling Department, Natural Sciences and Engineering Faculty, Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano, Bogotá, Colombia. e-mail: carlos.bojaca@utadeo.edu.co

The authors of this work declare no conflict of interest.

This article is under license Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

The mention of commercial equipment marks, instruments or specific materials obeys identification purposes, there is not any promotional commitment related to them, neither for the authors nor for the editor.


 

ARTIGO ORIGINAL

 

Determinación del comportamiento térmico de un invernadero colgante colombiano aplicando simulación CFD


RESUMEN

En Colombia la producción de flores se lleva a cabo en invernaderos de diferentes tipologías con una característica en común y es el control de clima de tipo pasivo. En la actualidad el conocimiento sobre el desempeño climático de estas estructuras es escaso. El objetivo del trabajo consistió en evaluar el comportamiento térmico de un invernadero capilla tipo colgante en condiciones de clima diurno y nocturno bajo las condiciones meteorológicas predominantes en la sabana de Bogotá. La evaluación se realizó mediante simulaciones numéricas empleando la dinámica de fluidos computacional (CFD) aplicada a un invernadero dedicado a la producción de rosa (Rosa sp.). Este enfoque metodológico permitió obtener los patrones de distribución térmica en el interior del invernadero, encontrando que para las condiciones meteorológicas evaluadas el invernadero genera unas condiciones térmicas inadecuadas para el desarrollo del cultivo durante el periodo nocturno donde el valor de la temperatura obtenido estuvo por debajo del mínimo recomendado de 15°C. La validación del modelo CFD se realizó comparando los resultados de las simulaciones y las temperaturas registradas en el prototipo real del invernadero, obteniendo un grado de ajuste adecuado entre los valores simulados y medidos y con una tendencia similar durante las 24 horas del día.

Palabras clave: 

dinámica de fluidos computacional; temperatura; simulación; periodo diurno; periodo nocturno.


En la actualidad, Colombia es el segundo país exportador de flores a nivel mundial y el primero en el continente americano. De acuerdo con reportes dados por la Cadena de Flores y Follajes del Ministerio de Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural (MADR) para el año 2017 se registraron 8.004 ha dedicadas a la producción de ornamentales, área que se encuentran distribuida en los departamentos de Cundinamarca y Antioquia. La producción anual total de tallos estimada es de 242,944 t. Este sector productivo aporta unos ingresos económicos relevantes en el PIB agropecuario, generando un ingreso de divisas cercanas a los 1,312,000,000 de dólares, donde la rosa aporta US$ 6,9 por kg exportado y ocupa un volumen del 30% del total de tallos exportados.

La producción nacional de flores se realiza en un alto porcentaje bajo invernadero, la estructura predominante es el invernadero tradicional que ocupa un 70% del área total, el 30% restante se encuentra ocupado por otras tipologías de invernadero dentro de los cuales se encuentra el invernadero capilla tipo colgante.

La temperatura es uno de los factores más relevantes a la hora de programar las actividades de control de clima (Campen & Bot, 2001). Principalmente porque cuando esta alcanza valores extremos en invernaderos pasivos (ventilados naturalmente) se limita la producción de forma parcial o total (Kittas et al., 2005). El control de la temperatura en los invernaderos pasivos colombianos es relevante en días calurosos de alta radiación en los que se hace necesario evacuar los excesos térmicos producidos al interior. Bajo estas condiciones es posible alcanzar temperaturas cercanas a 35 °C según Bojacá et al. (2009), que ocasionan desórdenes fisiológicos en las plantas (Sato et al., 2001). Adicionalmente, estos periodos de alta radiación suelen generar condiciones nocturnas secas y despejadas que favorecen la aparición del fenómeno de inversión térmica, fenómeno en el cual la temperatura interior del invernadero es inferior a la del aire exterior circundante.

El estudio del comportamiento térmico y aerodinámico de un invernadero puede realizarse a través de modelos empíricos de balance de energía, experimentación en campo, termografía digital o mediante simulación numérica aplicando técnicas como la dinámica de fluidos computacional (CFD, por sus siglas en inglés) (Chen, 2009). Esta herramienta permite realizar el análisis cualitativo y cuantitativo del comportamiento térmico de estructuras agrícolas o pecuarias bajo diferentes escenarios de simulación (Norton et al., 2007).

El objetivo de este trabajo consistió en desarrollar y ajustar un modelo numérico CFD 3D, con el fin de estudiar el comportamiento térmico de un invernadero capilla tipo colgante colombiano bajo condiciones climáticas de la sabana de Bogotá usado para la producción de rosa (Rosa sp.).

El trabajo experimental se desarrolló en un invernadero de 8640 m2 de área cubierta, perteneciente a una finca productora de Rosa (5º03’22.16’’N, 73º55’49.07’’W, 2583 msnm) ubicada en el municipio de Cogua (Cundinamarca).El invernadero evaluado estaba compuesto de 24 naves cada una con una luz de 6,0 m (Figura 1A), las alturas mínimas y máximas bajo canal fueron de 3,2 y 6,4 m respectivamente, la distancia longitudinal del invernadero fue de 60 m y estaba orientado en sentido noreste-suroeste (NE-SW). Cada nave disponía de una apertura de ventilación cenital móvil de 1,0 m de ancho y 48 m de longitud y unas aperturas laterales fijas de 1,9 m de ancho en cada uno de los cuatro costados de la estructura, para un área total de ventilación natural de 1927 m2.

Se evaluaron las condiciones meteorológicas exteriores para las 24 horas del día, dentro del periodo comprendido entre las 00:00 horas del 29 de marzo y las 23:00 horas de 02 de mayo del año 2016. El registro de las variables se realizó por medio de una estación meteorológica (Vantage Pro2 Plus, Davis Instruments, Hayward CA), que integraba sensores de radiación global, temperatura, humedad relativa, precipitación, velocidad del viento y dirección y la frecuencia de registro fue cada 10 minutos.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf5.jpg

FIGURA 1. 

A) Vista isométrica del invernadero evaluado, B) detalle del mallado y C) dominio computacional.

La simulación numérica CFD permite resolver las ecuaciones gobernantes del flujo de fluidos utilizando el método de volumen finito (Molina et al., 2009). Estas ecuaciones pueden ser representadas como ecuaciones de convección-difusión de un fluido para tres leyes de conservación, que incluyen las ecuaciones de momento, energía y transporte de un fluido compresible y en un campo tridimensional (3D) y se expresan así:

donde ρ es la densidad del fluido (kg m-3), es el operador nabla, ϕ representa la variable de concentración, v es el vector de velocidad (m s-1), Γ es el coeficiente de difusión (m2 s-1) y S representa el término fuente (Piscia et al., 2012). La naturaleza turbulenta del flujo de aire se simuló utilizando el modelo de turbulencia estándar k-ε, el cual se basa en dos ecuaciones principales, una para k que representa la energía cinética y otra para ε que representa la tasa de disipación en tiempo y volumen unitarios. Las ecuaciones de transporte para k y ε pueden ser modeladas como:

donde μ es viscosidad y μt es viscosidad turbulenta en (kg m-1s-1), σk y σϵ son los números turbulentos de Prandtl para k y ε , G k es la generación de energía cinética turbulenta debida a los gradientes de velocidad, G b es generación de energía cinética turbulenta debida a la flotabilidad, Y M es la dilatación fluctuante en la turbulencia debida a la tasa de disipacion global y v es el coeficiente de viscosidad cinemática. C1ϵ, C2ϵ, Cμ, σk y σϵ son constantes con valores predeterminados. Este modelo estándar k-ε ha sido ampliamente usado y validado en estudios enfocados a invernaderos demostrando una precisión adecuada (Fatnassi et al., 2006; Katsoulas et al., 2006).Todas las simulaciones consideraron la ecuación de energía lo cual permitió analizar el campo escalar de temperaturas al interior del invernadero. Así mismo se modeló el fenómeno de flotabilidad, fenómeno que impulsa el movimiento del aire bajo condición de velocidad exterior se realizó por medio de la aproximación de Boussinesq, que se describe de la siguiente forma:

donde ρ ref es la densidad constante del flujo; T ref es la temperatura real (°C) y β es el coeficiente de expansión térmica para el aire (β = 0.00329 °C-1). La aproximación de Boussinesq es válida si las diferencias de temperaturas que aparecen en el dominio computacional no son demasiado grandes β(T-T ref ) < 1, situación que generalmente ocurre en el estudio de microclima de invernaderos (Baeza et al., 2006).

El modelo de radiación seleccionado fue el de ordenadas discretas (DO) con discretización angular. Este modelo permite realizar el análisis de clima en condiciones de periodo nocturno, simulando y resolviendo el fenómeno de radiación desde el suelo del invernadero hacia el ambiente exterior. Para tal fin se consideró el cielo como un cuerpo negro con una temperatura equivalente (TC) de 0 °C para un escenario predominante de noches húmedas y despejadas (Iglesias et al., 2009).

El software de preprocesamiento ANSYS ICEM CFD (v. 17.0) se utilizó para generar un gran dominio computacional compuesto por el invernadero y sus alrededores, esto con el fin de garantizar la no afectación de la solución numérica del campo de flujo fuera del invernadero y para permitir una definición apropiada de la capa límite atmosférica (Rico, 2011). Las dimensiones del dominio computacional fueron de 354, 260 y 70 m para los ejes x, y, z, respectivamente (Figura 1C). Este tamaño se determinó siguiendo las pautas para el cálculo de CFD del entorno eólico alrededor de los edificios (Tominaga et al., 2008). El dominio computacional estuvo compuesto por una malla no estructurada de 76,651,871 volúmenes discretizados en el espacio, número de elementos que se obtuvo luego de verificar la independencia de las soluciones numéricas del flujo de aire a tamaños de malla con un número superior e inferior de elementos de acuerdo al procedimiento reportado por He et al. (2017). Un criterio fundamental para establecer la precisión de las soluciones consiste en evaluar la calidad de la malla (Figura 1B). Los parámetros de calidad evaluados fueron el tamaño de las celdas y la variación del tamaño de celda a celda encontrando que un 93,1% de las celdas de la malla estaban dentro del intervalo de calidad alta (0,95-1). También se evaluó la calidad ortogonal, donde el valor mínimo obtenido fue de 0,94, resultados que se clasifican dentro del rango de alta calidad (Flores et al., 2015). Los criterios de convergencia del modelo fueron establecidos en 10-8 para la ecuación de energía y en 10-6 para las ecuaciones de continuidad, momento y turbulencia (Baxevanou et al., 2017).

El límite superior del dominio y las superficies paralelas al flujo fueron fijados con condiciones de frontera de propiedades simétricas para no generar pérdidas de fricción del flujo de aire en contacto con estas superficies. Las simulaciones consideraron las características atmosféricas del municipio de Cogua tales como presión atmosférica de 74992 Pa, viscosidad del aire igual a 1,7E-05 kg m-1 s-1 y gravedad de 9,81 m s-2. Otras propiedades del polietileno y del suelo agrícola como calor especifico (Cp), conductividad térmica (k) y densidad (ρ) fueron establecidas de acuerdo con Villagrán et al. (2012). Los límites perimetrales del dominio computacional se establecieron como límites de entrada de aire o salida de presión según el caso evaluar. Se consideró un perfil uniforme de velocidad del viento evaluando velocidades con valores entre 0,001y 1,21 m s-1 y valores de temperatura medios para cada hora del día. Dichos valores fueron establecidos a partir de la información climática recopilada en el periodo de medición experimental.

Otros parámetros de entrada que son necesarios para alimentar el modelo de radiación son las propiedades ópticas del material de cubierta tales como, coeficiente absorción (α) de 0,69, coeficiente de transmisión (Ƭ) de 0,19 y coeficiente de reflexión (ρ) de 0,11. El modelo no incluyó cultivo alguno y se asumió una hermeticidad máxima del invernadero. Estas simplificaciones son válidas puesto que son aplicadas a cada una de los casos simulados y los errores que puedan derivarse tendrán el mismo grado de magnitud para cada escenario.

La evaluación se realizó asumiendo las condiciones meteorológicas medias para cada hora evaluada (Tabla 1) y la configuración de ventilación estándar del invernadero estudiado que, para este caso, fue ventilación lateral combinada con ventilación de techo para las horas diurnas (6-18 horas) y ventilación de techo para las condiciones nocturnas (19-5 horas).

TABLA 1. 

Condiciones meteorológicas medias usadas como parámetros de entrada al modelo CFD-3D

HoraTemperatura (°C)Velocidad viento (km h-1)Dirección del viento (°)Radiación solar (W m-2)
011,840,001117,620
111,740,007125,850
211,570124,570
311,440119,960
411,320,021123,080
511,390,031115,790
611,290109,780,2
711,450,017118,426,2
812,780,038106,09126,6
914,140,35169,85221,8
1015,790,42212280,1
1116,910,84194353,9
1217,690,85123,5376,9
1318,211,21192,3415,4
1418,381,17192,6356,6
1518,491,18157,4306,8
1618,231,19112,8238,9
1716,830,89156,590,3
1815,80,49155,830,2
1914,350,25132,30
2013,50,05115,90
2112,980,01117,30
2212,590,02121,90
2312,250,01120,30

La validación del modelo CFD se realizó a través de la comparación entre los resultados de las simulaciones y el registro experimental para la misma frecuencia temporal de la temperatura dentro del invernadero real durante el periodo de evaluación. La temperatura del aire del invernadero se registró por medio de treinta termopares tipo T (cobre-constantan) conectados a un número igual de registradores de datos (Cox-Tracer Junior, Escort DLS, Edison, NJ) desplegados de manera uniforme a 1.5 m de la superficie del suelo y registrando datos cada 10 minutos.

La validez del modelo se realizó mediante la comparación de los valores de temperatura medidos experimentalmente y los obtenidos a través de las simulaciones CFD, para las 24 horas del día. La Figura 2 muestra que el comportamiento de la temperatura para cada hora evaluada presenta un buen ajuste entre las dos metodologías usadas y a su vez una misma tendencia para el periodo de medición. Cuantitativamente al comparar los datos medidos y simulados se obtuvo un error porcentual absoluto medio (MAPE) de 4,26%, un error medio absoluto (MAE) de 0,75 °C y el error cuadrático medio (MSE) de 0,94 °C, valores que permiten garantizar que el uso del modelo CFD es adecuado para la evaluación y descripción del comportamiento térmico del invernadero.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf6.jpg

FIGURA 2. 

Perfil de temperatura horario medido y simulado dentro del invernadero capilla tipo colgante.

En la Table 2 se presenta la evolución temporal de la temperatura interior del invernadero para el periodo diurno. Se observa que la variable presento un valor mínimo de 12,17 °C para la hora 6 y alcanzó un valor máximo de 24,31 °C en la hora 14, este aumento temporal está influenciado por la radiación solar. El diferencial térmico entre el interior y el exterior del invernadero (∆T= Tmedia interior-Tmedia exterior) exhibió un valor mínimo de 0,88 °C para la hora 6. Este valor es coherente puesto que el aire interior del invernadero viene de un proceso de pérdida energética durante las horas nocturnas y adicionalmente la radiación solar para la hora 6 es generalmente baja en las zonas intertropicales, por lo tanto, la ganancia energética en el interior del invernadero es baja también. El valor máximo de ∆T fue de 5,93 °C para la hora 14, valor que es generado en función de la ganancia térmica en el interior del invernadero en el transcurso de 7 horas (7-14 horas)

TABLA 2. 

Temperatura media interior y diferencia térmica entre el interior y el exterior del invernadero para los escenarios de clima diurno simulados

HoraTemperatura media interior (°C)Diferencial térmico (∆T, °C)
612,170,88
714,162,71
817,524,74
918,554,41
1020,344,55
1121,384,47
1223,055,36
1324,105,89
1424,315,93
1524,125,63
1621,172,94
1719,182,35
1817,711,91

La temperatura es uno de los principales parámetros que incide en la calidad y crecimiento de los tallos florales. En el caso del cultivo de rosa es recomendable que las temperaturas óptimas en el periodo diurno se encuentren en valores que oscilen entre 21 y 24 °C según Yong (2004). Para el caso evaluado se observa que esto se cumple para el periodo comprendido entre las 11 y las 16 horas, para las horas restantes el valor de temperatura presenta niveles inferiores al recomendado; esto se traduce en ciclos vegetativos más largos y una menor producción de tallos Zieslin y Mor (1990). Adicionalmente, temperaturas entre 15 y 20°C y en condiciones de alta humedad favorecen la germinación de conidios de Botrytis cinérea Restrepo (2010), enfermedad que genera grandes pérdidas económicas en los cultivos de rosa de la sabana de Bogotá.

La Figura 3 presenta los patrones de distribución térmica en una sección vista de planta a 1,5 m del nivel del suelo para las horas 8, 12 y 16 (Figura 3 A-C). Para la hora 8 se puede observar un comportamiento térmico homogéneo con un valor medio de 17,52 °C (Figura 3A). Para la hora 12 se obtuvo un valor medio de temperatura de 23,05 °C, bajo esta condición se observa un comportamiento heterogéneo en un 40% del área evaluada, encontrando temperaturas más elevadas cerca de los costados laterales con valores medios de 25,1 °C y temperaturas más bajas con valores aproximados de 21,1 °C en la zona central del invernadero justo en las áreas de influencia de las ventilaciones de techo (Figura 3B). Estas condiciones heterogéneas no son adecuadas para la producción de flores ya que generan volúmenes de producción de tallos diferenciados en cantidad y calidad. Para la hora 16 el valor medio de temperatura interior obtenido fue de 21,17 °C, observando algunas zonas con valores de temperatura de 22,8 °C cerca de las aperturas laterales y frontales de ventilación (Figura 3C). Lo anterior permite concluir que las condiciones térmicas en el interior del invernadero no son totalmente homogéneas y el comportamiento térmico para las primeras horas del periodo diurno son las más desfavorables para la producción de rosa.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf7.jpg

FIGURA 3. 

Contornos de temperatura (°C) simulados para A) hora 8, B) hora 12 y C) hora 16.

En la Table 3 se pueden observar los valores medios de temperatura calculados para las horas nocturnas. El máximo valor de temperatura de 16,19 °C se registró para la hora 19, momento a partir del cual el comportamiento es decreciente a medida que trascurre la noche. Lo anterior se debe principalmente a que en los invernaderos pasivos se genera un enfriamiento radiativo desde el suelo hacia el ambiente exterior promovido por el confinamiento del aire interno y la alta transmisión de la cubierta plástica a las radiaciones infrarrojas (Majdoubi et al., 2016).

El invernadero presenta una hermeticidad térmica aceptable, lo que permitió la generación de ∆T positivos para las horas evaluadas, presentando unos valores máximos y mínimos de ∆T de 1,84 y 0,37 °C para la primera y última hora de la noche respectivamente. Teniendo en cuenta que las condiciones generales fueron despejadas y húmedas se debe mencionar que el invernadero presentó un comportamiento térmico que limitó la ocurrencia del fenómeno de inversión térmica que bajo estas condiciones meteorológicas predominantes es frecuente en los invernaderos colombianos.

La recomendación general para el cultivo de rosa es poder garantizar temperaturas nocturnas que oscilen entre los 15 y 17 °C (Yong, 2004). El análisis de los datos indicó que estos valores recomendados solo se obtienen para las horas 19 y 20. Las horas posteriores presentan valores medios por debajo del valor recomendado lo cual puede generar afectaciones relevantes en el crecimiento y desarrollo de la planta, en términos productivos bajo estas condiciones predomina la obtención de flores deformadas con un número de pétalos no deseables (Yong, 2004).

TABLA 3. 

Temperatura media interior y diferencia térmica entre el interior y el exterior del invernadero para los escenarios simulados de clima nocturno

HoraTemperatura media interior (°C)Diferencial térmico (∆T, °C)
1916,191,84
2015,231,73
2114,251,27
2213,761,17
2313,291,04
012,620,78
112,340,60
212,290,72
312,190,75
412,060,74
511,760,37

El análisis cualitativo de los patrones de distribución térmica en un plano a 1,5 m sobre el nivel del suelo para las horas 20, 0 y 4 se presenta en las Figuras 4 A, B y C. En general se observa un comportamiento térmico homogéneo para las tres horas evaluadas en aproximadamente un 95% del área evaluada.

2071-0054-rcta-28-03-e07-gf8.jpg

FIGURA 4. 

Contornos de temperatura (°C) simulados para A) hora 20, B) hora 0 y C) hora 4.

  • Se generó un modelo CFD 3D para estudiar el comportamiento térmico de un invernadero colgante colombiano, el modelo fue validado a través de la comparación de datos obtenidos experimentalmente y datos simulados, esta comparación mostro un grado de ajuste adecuado y una misma tendencia, por lo cual se concluye que el modelo CFD es fiable para desarrollar simulaciones numéricas y puede ser usado para evaluar el comportamiento térmico de otra tipología de invernaderos bajo las mismas condiciones meteorológicas.

  • Los resultados encontrados muestran un comportamiento térmico óptimo para un total de seis de las trece horas evaluadas en el periodo diurno, durante estas seis horas la temperatura osciló en el intervalo óptimo para la producción de rosa que es de 21 y 24 °C. Para el periodo nocturno se encontró que el comportamiento térmico es inadecuado para nueve de las once horas evaluadas, en las que los valores de temperatura fueron inferiores al mínimo recomendado de 15 °C. Estas condiciones pueden limitar la producción final del cultivo de rosa y la calidad comercial de los tallos florales.

  • Es recomendable que estudios posteriores incluyan otra serie de parámetros climáticos, tales como humedad relativa, déficit de presión de vapor o tasas de ventilación lo que permitirá realizar un análisis del comportamiento microclimático del invernadero y relacionarlo con el comportamiento agronómico y fisiológico de las plantas.

AGRADECIMIENTOS

Los autores agradecen al Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje (SENA), la Asociación Colombiana de Exportadores de Flores (Asocolflores) y al Centro de Innovación de la Floricultura Colombiana (Ceniflores). Conflicto de intereses: El manuscrito fue preparado y revisado con la participación de todos los autores, quienes declaramos que no existe conflicto. Financiación: Este estudio fue financiado por el SENA, Ceniflores y Asocolflores en el desarrollo del proyecto de investigación denominado “Generación de una herramienta de diseño u optimización de ventilación natural de los invernaderos dedicados a la producción de flores de corte en cuatro subregiones de la Sabana de Bogotá, mediante el uso de herramientas de simulación basadas en la técnica Dinámica de Fluidos Computacional (CFD)”.

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.