ORIGINAL ARTICLE

  

http://opn.to/a/j3ji1

Model of Soil -TillageTool Interaction Using Finite Element Method


ABSTRACT

Most of the soil-tillage tool interaction studies realized, both, experimental and numeric, have shown the influence of soil conditions (physical, mechanical and dynamic properties and type of soil), operation parameters of the tool (cutting deep, cutting speed, acceleration) and geometry in the magnitude of cutting forces. Those studies were carried out with little tool sliding to avoid distortion, which can cause convergence problems during the simulation. In this study, a three-dynamic (3D) lineal simulation model of soil narrow tool interaction was developed by the Finite Element Method (FEM) to analyze the tillage tool movement across a silt clay soil block (Ferrallitic). The extended Drucker˗Prager elastoplastic constitutive relation model was used to model, which was accomplished using the Solid Works design software, 2014 version and its complement Simulation. For a better connection between soil and tillage tool surfaces, and to achieve good soil elements movement on the tool surface, contact elements and Coulomb theorem were used. The model predicted the soil movement, soil fault surfaces, stresses distribution, both, in soil and tillage tool, as well as the draft forces. The results of the simulation model were compared with models and experimental data of the other authors, and good estimates and trends were obtained.

Keywords: 

3D dynamic simulation model; soil-tool interaction; finite elements.

 


The tillage tool-soil interaction is characterized by two phenomena: forces arisen in the soil-tool interphase (lateral and vertical draught forces) and displacement of soil particles (Ani et al., 2014).

An important part of the researches related with tillage tool-soil interaction has been focused on developing simulation models to predict the cutting forces under different soil conditions, tool geometry and operation parameters (Armin et al., 2014).

Significant effects of these parameters and conditions in draft forces have been experimentally demonstrated in several research works. Nonetheless, the experimental studies are expensive and their results depend on the precision of measurement instruments.

The Finite Element Method (FEM) has been utilized to a great extent at international level in the soil-tillage tool interaction, because of its potential to describe it in three dimensions (Herrera, 2006, Armin et al., 2014 and Tagar et al., 2015).

Many investigations of soil-tillage tool interaction by the finite element method have been realized focused to develop models, in two or three dimensions (Swick and Perumpral (1988), Mouazen and Neményi (1999), Abo et al.(2003, 2004), Brown (2012), Bentaher et al.(2013), Armin et al.(2014, 2015, 2016), Elbashir et al.(2014), Neisy (2014) and He et al.(2016). They have been both linear and non-linear models, elastic, plastic and elastoplastic models to predict the soil efforts on farming tool, the geometry influence in cutting forces as well as the energy consumption. Most of these researching was realized at small tool displacements and lower cutting velocities.

Dynamic simulation models of soil-tillage tool interaction by the finite element method have been developed by Swick and Perumpral (1988), Dechao and Yusu (1992) and Abo et al. (2003) keeping into account the cutting velocity, stresses level and acceleration.

When the soil-tillage tool interaction is analyzed as a dynamical process, it is taking into consideration the possible inertia effects regarding to the influence of soil mass and deformation grade. In such cases, the time is included in the formulation of the constitutive model (Herrera, 2006).

The goal of this study was to develop a 3D dynamic simulation model of the soil-tool farming interaction process to analyze the tool moving across the soil, the distribution and magnitude of stresses and strains, as well as the cutting forces.

Soil Model. In this study the soil-tool interaction is modeled by the yield Drucker-Prager linear function, which may be expressed as:

Where:

σ1,σ2,σ3   are the principal efforts

t: is the deviatory effort and can be calculated by:

K: is the ratio of the yield stress to the compression yield stress in triaxial test

Where:

φ     is the internal friction angle of soil

p is the normal effort acting on the soil, defined as:

β is the lifting angle referred commonly to material internal friction angle in the Drucker˗Prager model (Figure 1) and may be calculated as:

Q is the Von Misses equivalent stresses, calculated by:

r 3 is the third invariant of deviatory efforts

The cohesion d, when the hardening is defined by the same, is calculated as:

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf1.jpg

FIGURE 1. 

Yield criterion of the Extended Drucker-Prager model. a) Southern plane b) Principal stresses plane. (Hibbit, 2008).

Soil Properties. The soil was classified as red Ferrallitic, according to Second Genetic Classification of Soils in Cuba (Hernández et al., 1975), as Oxisol (Cid et al., 2011), as Rhodic Ferralsol (Hernández et al. 2015). Its density was 1200kg.m-3, its plasticity ratio was 36,2% and its organic matter content was 2,7%. The modulus of elasticity was determined by the slope of a tangential line of a stress- strain curve in straight section.The Poisson rate was determined by:

The cohesion and internal friction angle were determined by the Mohr graphical solution. According to the texture soil triangle according García de la Figal (2013), the soil in study is classified as no much dense.

Table 1 shows the properties and parameters of soil required for the FEM model.

TABLE 1. 

Properties and parameters required for the FEM model

Property or parameterSymbolDimension
Friction internal angleφ33º
Modulus of elasticityE5 000 000 Pa
Poisson ratioυ0,394
Flexion stressσ f 130 000 Pa
Dilatancy angleψ
Cohesiond15 000 Pa
Shear resistanceτ200 000 Pa
Shear modulusG1 793 400 Pa
Type of soil Lineal elastic
Traction limit of soilσ t 30 000 Pa
Compression limit of soilσ c 500 000 Pa
Elastic limit of soilσ e 42 000 Pa
Soil humidityH27%

Finite Element Model. A 3D dynamic simulation model in finite elements of the soil-tillage tool interaction was developed using the Solid Works design software. The tillage tool (vibratory curved bent leg) with logarithmic profile formed it. A vibratory mechanism with swimming masses was added to it and it is considered as a discreet rigid body (Figure 2).

The soil block was deformable in the bent leg interaction (Figure 3), it had a length (L) of 2m, width (B) 1m, height (H) 1m. The width of the soil prism chapped by the tool coincided with the chisel width (b=0,041 m). The working deep of the bent leg (D) was 0, 40 m and the cutting angle was 25 grades.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf2.png

FIGURE 2. 

Bent leg details.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf3.png

FIGURE 3. 

Soil block dimensions.

The growing of the chapped soil prism dimensions beyond the assigned does not affect the cutting forces (Bentaher et al., 2013) (Ibrahmi et al., 2014). The soil tool interaction was modeled tangential to the attack surface with contact model surface to surface.

Contact Modeling. In the block soil cutting process, the contact modeling is complicated because one of the surfaces (soil prism surface) does not exist initially in the model; it is formed as the process goes by (Figure 4)

The part of block soil converted in prism slides over the tool attack surface, which causes a contact zone with high friction between both surfaces and high stresses.

The contact problems are modeled by finite elements using basic contact surfaces (Rodriguez, 2001).The prism formation occurs gradually with the tool displacement towards block soil. Surface 1 becomes the tilled surface and surface 2 contacts surface 3 (attack surface of the tillage tool).

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf4.png

FIGURE 4. 

Contact model.

As the surface 3 is formed, the contact elements of this surface are activated as a contact surface, which will displace over the sliding line defined by them. They build up a contact surface between two deformable bodies (Figure 5).

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf5.png

FIGURE 5. 

Model in Solid Works of the soil-tillage tool contact.

Loads and Boundary Conditions. The model boundary conditions were established in function of performing loads. Gravity acceleration (9,81 m·s-2) and atmospheric pressure (101325 Pa) act on the block soil and it has restricted movement of its lateral (axis Z) and lower (axis Y) parts. The tillage tool moves at constant velocity (0,85 m.s-1) in the positive direction of axis X (Figure 6) with frequency of the vibratory mechanism of 14 Hz. The draft force applied was 15 000 N. The chapped prism moves over the chisel attack surface.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf6.png

FIGURE 6. 

Load and boundary conditions of the model.

Mesh of Model. The general model mesh was realized with maximum element size (e) of 0,03 m, minimum size of 0,006m and Newton Raphson iterative method was utilized. The surfaces in contact, both tool and chapped soil prism, were meshed applying mesh control, with element size of 0,004 m (Figure 7).

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf7.png

FIGURE 7. 

Model mesh.

The results of the tridimensional simulation model presented provided information regarding cutting forces, stresses, distortions and displacements, both soil and tool. The model was able to simulate the vibratory bent leg's displacement and vibrations with selected frequency and amplitude, as well as the chapped soil prism advance on the chisel surface.

Forces in Tillage Tool. Figure 8 shows the direction and magnitude of the resulting forces from the tillage tool- soil block interaction and from the advance of the tillage tool across the soil.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf8.png

FIGURE 8. 

Forces on the tip and on the attack surface of the tillage tool.

As it can be observed, the biggest values of the draft force are on the tip (Fx=-1350 N) and on the attack surface of tillage tool (Fx=-3890 N), in the direction of the tool movement and they have a minus sign. These values are similar to those obtained by other authors in previous researches (Moeenifar et al., 2014).

The magnitude of resulting forces is determined by the type of soil utilized in simulation (Davoudi et al., 2008). The maximum draft force (Fx) is considered as the necessary force to break the soil block in front of the tool and as the soil resistance when it is chapped (Elbashir et al., 2014b).

Stresses in Tillage Tool. Figure 9 shows the progress of von Misses stresses when the scarifier bent is tilling the soil. The model is able to simulate the soil-tool interaction process in adequate form.

The stresses increase during the initial contact phase between tool and soil and they are subsequently stabilized, which agrees with studies realized and experimental data published by other researchers (Mouazen and Neményi, 1999b; Abo et al., 2004b; Bentaher et al., 2013b; Chen et al., 2013 and Ibrahmi et al., 2014). These results show the validity of the implemented model.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf9.jpg

FIGURE 9. 

Von Misses stresses distribution for different time steps.

Normal Stresses in X Direction at the Tool Tip. When the contact with soil starts, the normal stresses in X direction at the tool tip (Fig.10) have a minimum value of 0,035 MPa, growing in asymptotic mode (Mouazen and Neményi, 1999b). As the bent move towards the soil block, the stresses reach a maximum value (0,28 MPa), decreasing again until they stabilize in an average value (approximately 0,15 MPa). It is mainly due to the oscillating movement of bent and to the soil resistance.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf10.png

FIGURE 10. 

Normal stresses in the X direction at the tool tip a) Statics in nodes b) dynamics.

Normal Stresses in Attack Surface. Normal stresses in attack surface (Figure 11) grow to a minimum value of 0,14 MPa until reaching a maximum value of 8,55 MPa, after are stabilized approximately in 3,92 MPa. This stresses average values are bigger than the tool tip because of the great contact area existing between this surface and block soil.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf11.jpg

FIGURE 11. 

Normal stresses in the X direction in the attack surface of the tool. Statics in nodes b) dynamics.

Model Validation. To validate the implemented simulation model, the validity of predefined fault surfaces, according to Abo et al. (2003a) in vertical plane (XY plane), was examined. The strain stresses distribution at zero displacement of the tillage tool (Figure 12a) and the tillage tool displacement of 300 mm (Figure 12b), were analyzed.

The continuous outlines of the strain stresses distribution along the predefined fault surfaces (Figure 12b) reveal the validity of them when the gravity force is applied on the model.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf12.jpg

FIGURE 12. 

a) Strain stresses distribution at 0.01 mm of the tillage tool displacement. b) At 300 mm of the tillage tool displacement.

A dynamic 3D simulation model of the soil- narrow tillage tool interaction using the finite element method was implemented.

The Drucker-Prager elastoplastic constitutive relation model utilized in simulation was able to predict the soil behavior when it interact with the tillage tool.

The predefined fault surfaces concept showed to be adequate for the 3D modeling of the soil-tillage tool problems.

The values of the model resulting forces were similar to those found in the consulted literature and bigger in the work surface of the tillage tool.

The values of resulting stresses of the simulation agree with the result of other authors in previous researches.

 

REFERENCES

ABO, E.M.; HAMILTON, R.; BOYLE, J.T.: “3D Dynamic analysis of soil-tool interaction using the finite element method”, Journal of Terramechanics, 40(1): 51-62, 2003a, ISSN: 0022-4898.

ABO, E.M.; HAMILTON, R.; BOYLE, J.T.: “3D Dynamic analysis of soil-tool interaction using the finite element method”, Journal of Terramechanics , 40(1): 51-62, 2003b, ISSN: 0022-4898.

ABO, E.M.; HAMILTON, R.; BOYLE, J.T.: “Simulation of soil-blade interaction for sandy soil using advanced 3D finite element analysis”, Soil and Tillage Research, 75(1): 61-73, 2004a, ISSN: 0167-1987.

ABO, E.M.; HAMILTON, R.; BOYLE, J.T.: “Simulation of soil-blade interaction for sandy soil using advanced 3D finite element analysis”, Soil and Tillage Research , 75(1): 61-73, 2004b, ISSN: 0167-1987.

ANI, A.O.; UZOEJINWA, B.B.; EZEAMA, O.A.; UGWU, S.N.; OHAGWU, C.J.; ODIGBOH, E.U.: “Soil Bin Facility for Soil-machine Interaction Studies”, En: Department of Agricultural and Bioresources Engineering, University of Nigeria , Nsukka, International Soil Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO) Nigeria Symposium, Akure , November 3 - 6, Nsukka, Nigeria, pp. 110 - 124, 2014.

ARMIN, A.; FOTOUHI, R.; SZYSZKOWSKI, W.: “On the FE modeling of soil-blade interaction in tillage operations”, Finite elements in analysis and design, 92: 1-11, 2014a, ISSN: 0168-874X.

ARMIN, A.; FOTOUHI, R.; SZYSZKOWSKI, W.: “On the FE modeling of soil-blade interaction in tillage operations”, Finite elements in analysis and design , 92: 1-11, 2014b, ISSN: 0168-874X.

ARMIN, A.; FOTOUHI, R.; SZYSZKOWSKI, W.: “On the FE modeling of soil-blade interaction in tillage operations”, Finite elements in analysis and design , 92: 1-11, 2014c, ISSN: 0168-874X.

ARMIN, A.; FOTOUHI, R.; SZYSZKOWSKI, W.: “3D Finite Element Analysis for Mechanics of Soil-Tool Interaction”, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, International Journal of Mechanical, Aerospace, Industrial, Mechatronic and Manufacturing Engineering, 9(5): 843-848, 2015.

ARMIN, A.; SZYSZKOWSKI, W.; FOTOUHI, R.: “3D Finite Element Analysis of Curved Blade’s Mechanics in Farming Tillage Operations”, En: World Congress on Engineering 2016 Vol II WCE 2016, June 29 - July 1, London, U.K., 2016.

BENTAHER, H.; IBRAHMI, A.; HAMZA, E.; HBAIEB, M.; KANTCHEV, G.; MAALEJ, A.; ARNOLD, W.: “Finite element simulation of moldboard-soil interaction”, Soil and Tillage Research , 134: 11-16, 2013a, ISSN: 0167-1987.

BENTAHER, H.; IBRAHMI, A.; HAMZA, E.; HBAIEB, M.; KANTCHEV, G.; MAALEJ, A.; ARNOLD, W.: “Finite element simulation of moldboard-soil interaction”, Soil and Tillage Research , 134: 11-16, 2013b, ISSN: 0167-1987.

BROWN, O.: Finite element analysis of blade-formation interactions in excavation, MSc. Thesis, Paper 5134, USA, 2012.

CHEN, Y.; MUNKHOLM, L.J.; NYORD, T.: “A discrete element model for soil-sweep interaction in three different soils”, Soil and Tillage Research , 126: 34-41, 2013, ISSN: 0167-1987.

CID, L.G.; LÓPEZ, T.; GONZÁLEZ, F.; HERRERA, J.; RUIZ, M.E.: “Propiedades físicas de algunos suelos de Cuba y su uso en modelos de simulación”, Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias, 20(2): 42-46, 2011, ISSN: 1010-2760, E-ISSN: 2071-0054.

DAVOUDI, S.; ALIMARDANI, R.; KEYHANI, A.; ATARNEJAD, R.: “A two dimensional finite element analysis of a plane tillage tool in soil using a non-linear elasto-plastic model”, American-Eurasian J. Agric. & Environ. Sci, 3(3): 498-505, 2008.

DECHAO, Z.; YUSU, Y.: “A dynamic model for soil cutting by blade and tine”, Journal of terramechanics, 29(3): 317-327, 1992, ISSN: 0022-4898.

ELBASHIR, M.A.; ZHAO, Z.; HEBEIL, E.A.; LI, X.Y.: “Comparative Finite Element Analysis of the Effects of Tillage Tool Geometry on Soil Disturbance and Reaction Forces”, Research Journal of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology, 7(15): 3145-3149, 2014a, ISSN: 2040-7459; E-ISSN: 2040-7467.

ELBASHIR, M.A.; ZHAO, Z.; HEBEIL, E.A.; LI, X.Y.: “Comparative Finite Element Analysis of the Effects of Tillage Tool Geometry on Soil Disturbance and Reaction Forces”, Research Journal of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology, 7(15): 3145-3149, 2014b, ISSN: 2040-7459; E-ISSN: 2040-7467.

GARCÍA DE LA FIGAL, C.A.E.: Maquinaria Agrícola II, Inst. Universidad Agraria de La Habana, Facultad de Ciencias Técnicas, Departamento de Ingeniería, Apuntes de clases, San José de las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, 2013.

HE, C.; YOU, Y.; WANG, D.; WANG, G.; LU, D.; KAJI, M.J.: “The effect of tine geometry during vertical movement on soil penetration resistance using finite element analysis”, Computers and Electronics in Agriculture, 130: 97-108, 2016, ISSN: 0168-1699.

HERNÁNDEZ, A.; PÉREZ, J.; BOSCH, D.; CASTRO, N.: Clasificación de los suelos de Cuba 2015 . edit. Ediciones INCA, Mayabeque, Cuba , 2015, 93 p, Ed. IINCA, San José de las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, 2015, ISBN: 978-959-7023-77-7.

HERNÁNDEZ, A.; PÉREZ, J.M.; ASCANIO, O.; ORTEGA, F.; ÁVILA, L.; CÁRDENAS, A.; MARRERO, A.: “II Clasificación genética de los suelos de Cuba”, Revista Agricultura, 8(1): 47-69, 1975.

HERRERA, S.M.: Simulación del comportamiento mecánico de los suelos Ferralíticos rojos mediante el método de elementos finitos , 107pp, Universidad Agraria de La Habana, PhD. Thesis, San José de las Lajas. Habana, Cuba, 109 p., 2006.

HIBBIT, K.: Abaqus Analysis User´s, Volume III, Materials, Inst. Hibbitt, Karlsson, and Sorensen, Inc., Pawtucket, Rhode Island, 180 p., 2008.

IBRAHMI, A.; BENTAHER, H.; MAALEJ, A.: “Soil-blade orientation effect on tillage forces determined by 3D finite element models”, Spanish Journal of Agricultural Research, 12(4): 941-951, 2014, ISSN: 2171-9292.

MOEINFAR, A.; MOUSAVI, S.S.R.; KALANTARI, D.: “Influence of tillage depth, penetration angle and forward speed on the soil/thin-blade interaction force”, Agricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal, 16(1): 69-74, 2014, ISSN: 1682-1130.

MOUAZEN, A.M.; NEMÉNYI, M.: “Finite element of subsoiler cutting in non-homogeneous sandy loam soil”, Soil & Tillage Research, 51: 1-15, 1999a, ISSN: 0167-1987.

MOUAZEN, A.M.; NEMÉNYI, M.: “Finite element of subsoiler cutting in non-homogeneous sandy loam soil”, Soil & Tillage Research, 51: 1-15, 1999b, ISSN: 0167-1987.

NEISY, I.: “Introduction to the study of soil-tool modelling”, Walia journal (Iran), 30(1): 31-34, 2014, ISSN: 1026-3861.

SWICK, W.C.; PERUMPRAL, J.: “A model for predicting soil-tool interaction”, Journal of Terramechanics , 25(1): 43-56, 1988a, ISSN: 0022-4898.

SWICK, W.C.; PERUMPRAL, J.: “A model for predicting soil-tool interaction”, Journal of Terramechanics , 25(1): 43-56, 1988b, ISSN: 0022-4898.

TAGAR, A.A.; CHANGYING, J.; ADAMOWSKI, J.; MALARD, J.; QI, C.S.; QISHUO, D.; ABBASI, N.A.: “Finite element simulation of soil failure patterns under soil bin and field testing conditions”, Soil and Tillage Research , 145: 157-170, 2015, ISSN: 0167-1987.

 

 

 

 


Luis Orlando Marín Cabrera, investigador, aspirante al doctorado, Universidad Agraria de La Habana (UNAH), Facultad de Ciencias Técnicas, Centro de Mecanización Agropecuaria (CEMA), San José de las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, e-mail: luismc@unah.edu.cu

Armando Eloy García de la Figal Costales, Profesor e Investigador Titular, Universidad Agraria de La Habana (UNAH). Facultad de Ciencias Técnicas, San José de las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, e-mail: areloy@isch.edu.cu

The authors of this work declare no conflict of interest.

This article is under license Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

The mention of commercial equipment marks, instruments or specific materials obeys identification purposes, there is not any promotional commitment related to them, neither for the authors nor for the editor.


 

ARTÍCULO ORIGINAL

 

Modelo de la interacción suelo herramienta de labranza estrecha utilizando el Método de Elementos Finitos


RESUMEN

La mayor parte de los estudios de la interacción suelo˗herramienta de labranza realizados, tanto experimentales como numéricos, han mostrado la influencia de las condiciones del suelo (propiedades físicas, mecánicas y dinámicas, tipo de suelo), parámetros de operación de la herramienta (profundidad de corte, velocidad de corte, aceleración) y geometría de la misma en la magnitud de las fuerzas de corte. Los mismos se han llevado a cabo con pequeños deslizamientos de la herramienta para evitar la distorsión, lo cual puede provocar problemas de convergencia durante la simulación. En este estudio, un modelo de simulación tridimensional (3D) lineal dinámico de la interacción suelo˗herramienta de labranza estrecha ha sido desarrollado mediante el método de elementos finitos (MEF) para analizar el movimiento de la herramienta de cultivo a través de un bloque de suelo tipo arcilloso limoso (ferralítico).Se utilizó el modelo elastoplástico de relación constitutiva(Drucker˗Prager)para la modelación, la cual fue realizada utilizando el software de diseño Solid Works, versión 2014y su complemento Simulation. Para una mejor conexión entre las superficies, tanto del suelo como de la herramienta de cultivo, fueron utilizados elementos de contacto y el teorema de Coulomb para lograr buen movimiento de los elementos del suelo sobre la superficie de trabajo de la herramienta. El modelo predijo el movimiento del suelo, las superficies de falla del mismo, distribución de tensiones tanto en el suelo como en la herramienta de cultivo, así como las fuerzas de corte. Se compararon los resultados del modelo de simulación con otros modelos y datos experimentales de otros autores, obteniéndose buenas predicciones y similares tendencias.

Palabras clave: 

Modelo de simulación dinámico 3D; interacción suelo˗ herramienta; elementos finitos.


La interacción suelo˗herramienta de labranza se caracteriza por dos fenómenos: fuerzas que surgen en la interfase suelo-herramienta (fuerzas de tracción, laterales y verticales) y desplazamiento de las partículas de suelo (Ani et al., 2014).

Una parte importante de las investigaciones relacionadas con la interacción suelo˗herramienta de labranza ha sido enfocada al desarrollo de modelos de simulación para predecir las fuerzas de corte bajo diferentes condiciones de suelo, geometría de la herramienta y parámetros de operación (Armin et al., 2014). Efectos bastante significativos de esas condiciones y parámetros en las fuerzas de corte han sido demostrados experimentalmente en varios trabajos de investigación. No obstante, los estudios experimentales de la interacción suelo˗herramienta son caros y sus resultados dependen de la precisión de los instrumentos de medición.

El MEF ha sido utilizado con gran aceptación a escala internacional en la simulación computacional de la interacción suelo-herramienta de labranza, debido a su potencial para describir la misma en tres dimensiones (Herrera, 2006; Armin et al., 2014b; Tagar et al., 2015).

Para la simulación de la interacción suelo-herramienta de labranza mediante el MEF se han realizado numerosas investigaciones en el ámbito internacional, entre ellas las de Swick y Perumpral (1988); Mouazen y Neményi(1999); Abo et al.(2003, 2004); Brown (2012); Bentaher et al.(2013); Armin et al.(2014, 2015, 2016); Elbashir et al.(2014); Neisy (2014); He et al.(2016), con el objetivo de desarrollar modelos, en dos ó tres dimensiones, tanto lineales como no lineales; elásticos, plásticos y elastoplásticos, para la predicción de los esfuerzos del suelo sobre la herramienta de cultivo, la influencia de la geometría en las fuerzas de corte, así como el consumo energético de las mismas. La mayoría de ellos se han realizado con pequeños desplazamientos de la herramienta y a bajas velocidades de corte.

Modelos dinámicos de simulación de la interacción suelo˗herramienta por el MEF han sido desarrollados por (Swick y Perumpral, 1988; Dechao y Yusu, 1992; Abo et al., 2003)en los cuales se han tenido en cuenta la velocidad de corte, el nivel de tensiones y la aceleración. Cuando se analiza la interacción suelo-herramienta de labranza como un proceso dinámico, se consideran los posibles efectos de inercia referidos a la influencia de la masa de suelo y los del grado de deformación. En estos casos se incorpora el tiempo dentro de la formulación del modelo constitutivo (Herrera, 2006).

El objetivo general de este estudio es desarrollar un modelo de simulación 3Ddinámicodel proceso de interacción suelo˗herramienta de labranza, que permita el análisis del movimiento de la herramienta a través del suelo, la distribución y magnitud de las tensiones y deformaciones, así como las fuerzas de corte.

Modelo para el suelo. En el presente estudio, la interacción suelo˗herramienta es modelada mediante la función de fluencia de Drucker˗Prager lineal, la cual se expresa como:

Donde:

σ1, σ2, σ3

- son los esfuerzos principales máximos, intermedios y mínimos

t

- es el esfuerzo desviador y se calcula por:

K es el coeficiente que relaciona los esfuerzos desviadores obtenidos en triaxial extensión con los obtenidos en triaxial compresión, calculándose como:

Donde:

φ

- es el ángulo de fricción interna

p

- es el esfuerzo normal que actúa sobre el suelo y se define como:

Β ángulo que define la pendiente de la superficie de fluencia lineal, el cual está referido comúnmente al ángulo de fricción interna del material en el modelo de Drucker˗Prager Extendido(Figura 1)y se calcula por:

q son las tensiones equivalentes de Von Mises y se expresan por:

r 3 es el esfuerzo desviador, el cual se calcula por:

La cohesión d, cuando el endurecimiento se define por ésta, se calcula como:

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf21.jpg

FIGURA 1. 

Criterio de Fluencia del Modelo Drucker-Prager extendido. a) Plano meridional; b) Plano de tensiones principales.

Propiedades del suelo. El suelo se clasificó como ferralítico rojo típico según la Segunda Clasificación Genética de los Suelos en Cuba(Hernández et al., 1975), como Oxisol(Cid et al., 2011)y como Rhodic Ferralsol Hernández et al. (2015), con una densidad de 1200kg·m-3, índice de plasticidad de 36,2% y contenido de materia orgánica 2,7%. El módulo de elasticidad se determinó como la pendiente de una recta tangente a la curva esfuerzo-deformación en su tramo recto. El coeficiente de Poisson se determinó mediante la ecuación

La cohesión y el ángulo de fricción interna fueron determinados mediante la solución gráfica de Mohr. Según el triángulo de textura del suelo García de la Figal (2013), el suelo en estudio se clasifica como arcilloso poco denso.

La Tabla 1 muestra las propiedades y parámetros del suelo requeridos por el modelo de elementos finitos.

TABLA 1. 

Propiedades y parámetros requeridos por el modelo FEM

Propiedad o parámetroSímboloDimensión
Ángulo de fricción internaφ33º
Módulo de elasticidadE5 000 000 Pa
Coeficiente de Poissonυ0,394
Tensión de flexión del sueloσ f 130 000 Pa
Ángulo de dilataciónψ
Cohesiónd15 000 Pa
Resistencia a los esfuerzos cortantesτ200 000 Pa
Módulo cortanteG1 793 400 Pa
Tipo de suelo Isotrópico elástico lineal
Límite de tracción del sueloσ t 30 000 Pa
Límite de compresión del sueloσ c 500 000 Pa
Límite elástico del sueloσ e 42 000 Pa
Humedad del sueloH27%

Modelo de elementos finitos . Un modelo de simulación en 3D dinámico de la interacción herramienta de labranza-suelo en elementos finitos ha sido desarrollado utilizando el software de diseño Solid Works. Está formado por la herramienta de labranza (brazo escarificador vibratorio curvo) con perfil logarítmico, al cual se le adiciona un mecanismo vibrador con masas desbalanceadas y es considerada como un cuerpo rígido discreto (Figura 2). El bloque de suelo es deformable en interacción con el brazo escarificador (Fig.3), tiene una longitud (L) de 2m, su ancho (B) es de 1m, la altura (H) es de 1m. El ancho del prisma de suelo cortado por la herramienta coincide con el ancho de la reja del brazo (b=0,041m). La profundidad de trabajo del brazo (D) es de 0,40m y el ángulo de corte es de 25 grados.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf22.png

FIGURA 2. 

Detalles del brazo.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf23.png

FIGURA 3. 

Dimensiones del bloque de suelo.

Se asume que el aumento de las dimensiones del prisma de suelo cortado más allá de las asignadas no afecta las fuerzas de corte (Bentaher et al., 2013)(Ibrahmi et al., 2014). La interacción herramienta-suelo se modeló tangencialmente a la superficie de ataque con modelo de contacto superficie a superficie.

Modelación del contacto. En el proceso de corte del bloque de suelo, la modelación del contacto es muy complicada, pues una de las superficies, la del prisma de suelo, no existe inicialmente en el modelo, sino que se forma en la medida que transcurre el proceso (Figura 4). La parte del bloque de suelo que es convertida en prisma se desliza sobre la superficie de ataque de la herramienta, provocando una zona de contacto con alta fricción entre ambas superficies y altas tensiones.

Los problemas de contacto son modelados por elementos finitos usando superficies básicas de contacto (Rodríguez, 2001). Con el desplazamiento de la herramienta hacia el bloque de suelo, ocurre gradualmente la formación del prisma, en el cual la superficie 1 pasa a ser la superficie labrada, y la superficie 2 entra en contacto con la superficie 3 (superficie de ataque de la herramienta de labranza).

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf24.png

FIGURA 4. 

Modelo de contacto.

A medida que se forma la superficie 3, los elementos de contacto de la misma se activan como una superficie de contacto, que se desplazará sobre una línea de deslizamiento definida por los mismos, los cuales conforman una superficie de contacto entre dos cuerpos deformables (Figura 5).

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf25.png

FIGURA 5. 

Modelo en Solid Works del contacto herramienta de labranza-suelo.

Cargas y condiciones de contorno. Las condiciones de contorno al modelo se establecieron en función de las cargas actuantes. Sobre el bloque de suelo actúa la aceleración de la gravedad (9,81 m·s-2) y la presión atmosférica (101325 Pa) y tiene restricciones de movimiento lateralmente (eje Z) y por su parte inferior (eje Y). La herramienta de labranza se desplaza a velocidad constante de 1,2 m.s-1 en la dirección positiva del eje X (Figura 6), con frecuencia de las vibraciones del mecanismo vibrador de 14Hz la fuerza de tracción aplicada a la misma fue de 15000 N y el prisma de suelo cortado se desplaza sobre la superficie de ataque de la reja.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf26.png

FIGURA 6. 

Cargas y condiciones de contorno del modelo

Discretización del modelo. La discretización general del modelo se realizó con un tamaño de elementos (e) máximo de 0,03 m, tamaño mínimo de 0,006 m y se utilizó el método iterativo de Newton-Raphson. Las superficie en contacto, tanto de la herramienta como del prisma de suelo cortado se discretizaron aplicando control de mallado, con tamaño de elemento de 0,004 m (Figura 7).

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf27.png

FIGURA 7. 

Discretización del modelo.

Los resultados del modelo de simulación tridimensional dinámico presentado proporcionaron información respecto a fuerzas de corte, tensiones, deformaciones y desplazamientos del suelo y la herramienta. El modelo simuló el desplazamiento y las vibraciones del brazo escarificador con la frecuencia y amplitud seleccionadas, así como el avance del prisma de suelo cortado sobre la superficie de ataque de la reja.

Fuerzas en la herramienta de labranza. La Figura 8 muestra la magnitud y dirección de las fuerzas resultantes obtenidas como resultado de la interacción de la herramienta de labranza con el bloque de suelo y de su avance a través de la misma.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf28.png

FIGURA 8. 

Fuerzas en la punta y superficie de ataque de la herramienta.

Como puede observarse, los mayores valores de la fuerza de tracción están en la punta (Fx=-1350 N) y superficie de ataque de la herramienta (Fx=-3890 N), en la dirección del movimiento de avance de ésta y tienen signo negativo. Estos valores son similares a los obtenidos por otros autores en investigaciones anteriores ( Moeinfar et al., 2014).

La magnitud de las fuerzas resultantes está determinada por el tipo de suelo utilizado en la modelación (Davoudi et al., 2008). La fuerza de tracción máxima (Fx) es considerada como la fuerza necesaria para la falla del bloque de suelo delante de la herramienta y como la resistencia del suelo a ser cortado por la misma(Elbashir et al., 2014b).

Tensiones en la herramienta de labranza. La Figura 9 muestra el progreso de las tensiones de von Mises cuando el brazo escarificador labora el suelo. El modelo simula de forma adecuada el proceso de interacción suelo-herramienta.

Las tensiones aumentan durante la fase inicial de contacto entre la herramienta de labranza y el suelo y posteriormente se estabilizan, lo cual coincide con estudios realizados y datos experimentales publicados por otros investigadores (Mouazen y Neményi, 1999b; Abo et al., 2004b; Bentaher et al., 2013b; Chen et al., 2013); (Ibrahmi et al., 2014). Estos resultados muestran la validez del modelo de simulación implementado.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf29.jpg

FIGURA 9. 

Distribución de tensiones de von Mises para diferentes pasos de tiempo.

Tensiones normales en dirección X en la punta de la herramienta. Cuando comienza el contacto con el suelo, las tensiones normales en dirección X en la punta de la herramienta (Figura 10) tienen un valor mínimo de 0,035MPa, aumentando de forma asintótica (Mouazen y Neményi, 1999b). A medida que avanza el brazo sobre el bloque de suelo, las tensiones alcanzan un máximo valor dado (0,28MPa), disminuyendo nuevamente hasta estabilizarse en un valor promedio de aproximadamente 0,15 MPa. Esto se debe, en lo fundamental, al movimiento oscilatorio del brazo y a la resistencia del suelo.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf30.png

FIGURA 10. 

Tensiones normales en dirección X en la punta de la herramienta de labranza a) Estáticas en los nodos b) dinámicas.

Tensiones en la superficie de ataque. Las tensiones en la superficie de ataque (Figura 11) aumentan desde un valor mínimo de 0,14 MPa hasta alcanzar un máximo valor de 8,55 MPa, luego se estabilizan en aproximadamente 3,92 MPa. Estos valores promedio de tensiones son mayores que en la punta de la herramienta debido a la mayor área de contacto que existe entre esta superficie y el bloque de suelo.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf31.jpg

FIGURA 11. 

Tensiones normales en dirección X en la superficie de ataque de la herramienta de labranza a) Estáticas en los nodos b) dinámicas.

Validación del modelo. Para la validación del modelo de simulación implementado se examinó la validez de las superficies de falla predefinidas por Abo et al. (2003a) en el plano vertical (plano XY) analizando la distribución de tensiones tangenciales a cero desplazamiento de la herramienta de labranza (Figura 12a) y a 300 mm de desplazamiento (Figura 12b).

Los contornos continuos de la distribución de tensiones tangenciales a lo largo de las superficies de falla predefinidas (Figura 12b), revelan la validez de las mismas al ser aplicada sobre el modelo la fuerza de gravedad.

2071-0054-rcta-28-04-e04-gf32.jpg

FIGURA 12. 

a) Distribución de tensiones tangenciales a 0.01 mm desplazamiento de la herramienta. b) Distribución de tensiones tangenciales a 300 mm de desplazamiento.

Un modelo de simulación dinámico tridimensional (3D) de la interacción suelo-herramienta de labranza estrecha utilizando el método de elementos finitos ha sido implementado.

El modelo elastoplástico de relación constitutiva de Drucker-Prager utilizado en la simulación fue capaz de predecir el comportamiento del suelo al interactuar con la herramienta de labranza.

El concepto de superficies de falla predefinidas ha sido mostrado ser adecuado para el modelado en tres dimensiones de los problemas de la interacción suelo-herramienta de labranza.

Los valores de las fuerzas resultantes del modelo son similares a los encontrados en la literatura consultada y son mayores en la superficie de trabajo de la herramienta de labranza.

Los valores de las tensiones resultantes de la simulación concuerdan con los obtenidos por otros autores en investigaciones anteriores.

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.